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Victor Ewald may not be a name that rings a bell for a lot of people, save perhaps brass players. The Russian composer was roughly contemporary to Rachmaninoff, and his harmonic language bears some vague resemblance to the pianist-composer. What Ewald is best known for today is his brass pieces that, in execution, seem to be about as close to a string quartet as can be found in the brass literature. This is his Brass Quintet, No. 1, played by members of the Chicago Symphony brass section. An interesting and lyrical listen.

12:13 pm: jacquesdupuis

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A classic performance of Bruckner’s Te deum, with Karajan’s trademark stoic power. If you want something a little broader, there’s also the Celibidache performance with Munich. 

11:01 am: jacquesdupuis3 notes

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I spy an opinion in the flute part for the Bruckner Te deum….

I spy an opinion in the flute part for the Bruckner Te deum….

09:09 pm: jacquesdupuis16 notes

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A fun blog to follow if you’re looking for a new one.
composersdoingnormalshit:

John Cage picking mushrooms.

A fun blog to follow if you’re looking for a new one.

composersdoingnormalshit:

John Cage picking mushrooms.

04:04 pm: jacquesdupuis535 notes

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"Oh, there’s a link on Grove to the new Grove Dictionary of American Music! I would love to have that on my shelf.”
*clicks through link*
"Oh, dear, that is…expensive."

"Oh, there’s a link on Grove to the new Grove Dictionary of American Music! I would love to have that on my shelf.”

*clicks through link*

"Oh, dear, that is…expensive."

09:55 pm: jacquesdupuis10 notes

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That jaw is unmistakable.

That jaw is unmistakable.

(Source: barcarole, via allegroassai)

06:43 pm: jacquesdupuis347 notes

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The from-below view at the beginning of this video of Yuja Wang is really fascinating, as it really shows the independence of lines and counterpoint of the piece. (The playing is also really fascinating, but that’s hardly surprising for Wang, right?)

05:18 pm: jacquesdupuis11 notes

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This recording of Maazel conducting Brahms’s Symphony No. 4 is quite good. I’ve been hooked on the second movement since sitting by the violin section at this BSO concert a few weeks ago; Haitink was at the top of his game during the Brahms and, maybe it was the close proximity to strings, but I’ve never heard the pizz. “accompaniment” like that before and it’s what’s been keeping me coming back. I’ve been looking around for my favorite recording of just that movement (I have a hard time liking any recording straight through, possibly because there’s just too much going on through the whole symphony that to get a full interp that I like is a pipedream), and I came across this 2009 recording of Harnoncourt conducting the Royal Concertgebouw. Their (I hesitate to credit conductor or orchestra individually) phrasing of the winds and brass puts it over the top for me. The music itself is pretty transcendent, and catching the mood is difficult; getting a balance of lyricism with the stoic persistence of strings ticking away underneath is damn near impossible.

11:44 am: jacquesdupuis5 notes

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Before Valentine’s Day is over, listen to Fischer-Dieskau sing Schubert’s timeless love song, “Du bist die Ruh.”

Here’s a translation and short write up from Harper’s in 2008. 

11:37 pm: jacquesdupuis3 notes

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I do not understand how this man played piano, with his posture, etc. Pretty amazing to watch, anyway.

Glenn Gould records the Goldberg Variations.

(Source: jacquesdupuis)

05:53 pm: jacquesdupuis11 notes

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