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To my knowledge (please, correct me if I’m wrong), violins haven’t had their bridge in that spot since they took the modern form more than 300 years ago, if ever, and certainly not in the 19th century, something of which curators at The Henry Ford in Detroit were evidently not aware when assembling this exhibit. It’s a small detail, but in the world of performance, it’s one that would legitimately make a big difference, for obvious reasons. No one is playing this instrument, but the quality of exhibits and museums is often in the details. This is is why it actually does matter to hire people who know this sort of specialty knowledge.

To my knowledge (please, correct me if I’m wrong), violins haven’t had their bridge in that spot since they took the modern form more than 300 years ago, if ever, and certainly not in the 19th century, something of which curators at The Henry Ford in Detroit were evidently not aware when assembling this exhibit. It’s a small detail, but in the world of performance, it’s one that would legitimately make a big difference, for obvious reasons. No one is playing this instrument, but the quality of exhibits and museums is often in the details. This is is why it actually does matter to hire people who know this sort of specialty knowledge.

04:37 pm: jacquesdupuis4 notes

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The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation

Congratulations to John Luther Adams for winning the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in music for his piece, "Become Ocean."

04:21 pm: jacquesdupuis

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There’s something incredible about this video of Lotte Lenya singing Kurt Weill’s “Alabama Song” (a favorite of David Bowie and, in some capacity, The Doors). It might have to do with her marriage to Weill, but there’s something strikingly authentic about the way she sings the song.

11:48 pm: jacquesdupuis8 notes

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Just 374 years ago on this date, Handel’s Messiah was premiered in Dublin. Timeless as ever.

(Source: jacquesdupuis)

06:06 pm: jacquesdupuis2 notes

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Brahms’s dark setting of Goethe’s “Gesang der Parzen” from Iphigenia auf Tauris. The text is itself dark, and Brahms paid close attention, especially via scoring, to bring that out. Lots of moments with bassoon, low strings, and a division of alto and bass parts to keep the weight of the sound in the bottom. Translation here.

03:33 pm: jacquesdupuis9 notes

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Charles Ives sitting on a bench with his cane.
(source)

Charles Ives sitting on a bench with his cane.

(source)

09:51 pm: jacquesdupuis6 notes

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Jeremy Denk Is to Receive the Avery Fisher Prize

oberlinconservatory:

Jeremy’s at it again!

(via sonateharder)

08:01 pm: jacquesdupuis9 notes

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"…the concert began. I heard it through the door - some serenade - at first only vaguely…but presently the sound insisted - a solemn Adagio in E flat. It started simply enough: just a pulse in the lowest registers - bassoons and basset horns - like a rusty squeezebox. It would have been comic except for the slowness, which gave it instead a sort of serenity. And then suddenly, high above it, sounded a single note on the oboe. It hung there unwavering, piercing me through, till breath could hold it no longer, and a clarinet withdrew it out of me, and sweetened it into a phrase of such delight it had me trembling. The light flickered in the room. My eyes clouded! The squeezebox groaned louder, and over it the higher instruments wailed and warbled, throwing lines of sound around me -  long lines of pain around and through me. Ah, the pain! Pain as I had never known it. I called up my sharp old God, ‘What is this?…What?!' But the squeezebox went on and on, and the pain cut deeper into my shaking head, until suddenly I was running, dashing through the side door, stumbling downstairs into the street, into the cold night, gasping for life.”

Maybe the characterization of Salieri in Amadeus is not entirely inaccurate? The above is an account by Salieri upon hearing Mozart’s Serenade for Winds in B flat major, K. 361.

(Source: jacquesdupuis)

10:00 pm: jacquesdupuis13 notes

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Cziffra playing Schumann’s Toccata, Op. 7. A lot of notes for a man who liked playing a lot of notes.

08:41 pm: jacquesdupuis20 notes

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ihavenothingtosayandimsayingit:

The Rite of Spring by Jean Cocteau (1913).

ihavenothingtosayandimsayingit:

The Rite of Spring by Jean Cocteau (1913).

10:49 pm: jacquesdupuis13 notes

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